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Best Team Compositions for TFT Set 2

Mike Plant  | 
We’ve put together some of the best comps in TFT Set 2 to make that transition a bit easier (Image via Riot Games)

We’ve put together some of the best comps in TFT Set 2 to make that transition a bit easier (Image via Riot Games)

Teamfight Tactics Set 2 is out and brings with it a lot of change. Very few of the TFT Set 1 champions return, and those that do have different synergies, abilities, and costs. Learning an entirely new game on the fly can be a daunting experience. Even if you know what every unit does and how they synergize, you still have to test them all to figure out which units and synergies are worthwhile.

We’ve put together some of the best compositions in TFT Set 2 to make that transition a bit easier. None of them require leveling to 9, and most come online as early as level 6. It won’t be possible to hit these compositions every game, so we go into detail with unit and synergy substitutions that work. The game may not give you the perfect composition, but running versions of these compositions will help you find success.

We break down what units you should look for early, where you should place your units on the battlefield, and what types of items you should put on each champion.

Ocean Mage

The Ocean Mage comp comes online quickly in TFT Set 2 (Image via Riot Games)

The Ocean Mage comp comes online quickly in TFT Set 2 (Image via Riot Games)

Core (5): Vladimir, Syndra, Brand, Thresh, Nautilus

Synergies (3): Four Ocean, Three Mage, Two Warden

Ocean Mage is a very versatile comp that comes online quickly. The four Ocean champions — Vladimir, Syndra, Thresh, and Nautilus — are all 3-cost or less. Brand is the strongest mage and one of the most powerful units in the game. However, you can add in any other mage until you hit the more expensive Brand to achieve the listed synergies.

Once you have your core five, you can go in many directions because these units already synergize so well with each other. The strongest version is to add Inferno at level 7 and Summoner at level 8. Annie and Zyra are Inferno/Summoners you can add to Brand to get that synergy. Then add Yorick or Zed at 8 to complete the comp. Some other synergies you can add to the core five include: Shadow, six Mage, Mystic, or four Warden.

Thresh and Nautilus will be the frontline. Vladimir can also be placed in the first or second row if he gets 3-starred. Syndra and Brand will want to be on or near the last row. Brand will carry items, preferring mana and damage, so prioritize items like Seraph’s Embrace, Spirit of Sojin, Deathcap, and Morellonomicon. If Vlad is 3-starred, put tank items on him like Phantom Dancer, Guardian’s Angel, Warmog’s Armor, or Dragon’s Claw. If not, put those items on Nautilus. He also uses Iceborn Gauntlet well.

Predator Poison

A quick three-star Kog'Maw can prove valuable in TFT (Image via Riot Games)

A quick three-star Kog’Maw can prove valuable in TFT (Image via Riot Games)

Core (7): Kog’Maw, Warwick, Rek’Sai, Volibear, Dr. Mundo, Olaf, Singed

Synergies (5): Alchemist, Three Poison, Three Predator, Three Glacial, Three Berserker

Predator Poison functions best when you are able to 3-star Kog’Maw early, but it’s not mandatory. The first synergy to get online is Predator. You can pair Kog’Maw with any two of Warwick, Skarner, and Rek’Sai. Volibear is a good follow up add for Glacial synergy with Warwick. He also leads into the later Berserker build and can be used with an early Ornn for Electric.

Olaf gives Berserker with Volibear and Dr. Mundo, but he’s not mandatory if you can’t get him to 2-star. Leaving in Ornn and adding Zed or Electric Lux in his place can replace his damage. Twitch can also be used as a placeholder for three Poison until you find Singed. Even if you don’t end up running Berserker, you’ll want to replace the Twitch instead of the Dr. Mundo. Despite costing more, Twitch is a worse standalone unit.

Any unit but Kog’Maw can be played for frontline, though Volibear and Rek’Sai are generally moved back a row or two for more survivability. Make sure to center your Kog’Maw and put units to either side of him if you are against assassin players. Singed should be front and center to apply Poison as quickly as possible.

Kog’Maw wants AoE items to execute enemies with Predator and spread Poison. AD items like Stattik Shiv and Runaan’s Hurricane or an AP item like Luden’s Echo are preferable. Singed’s ideal item is Morellonomicon. If running Olaf, he can be given Guinsoo’s Rageblade and tank items. Otherwise, put your remaining items on Rek’Sai (or Skarner).

Light

A two-star Kindred can be key to making the Light comp start rolling quickly (Image via Riot Games)

A two-star Kindred can be key to making the Light comp start rolling quickly (Image via Riot Games)

Core (8): Vayne, Nasus, Jax, Aatrox, Soraka, Kindred, Yorick, Master Yi

Synergies (5): Six Light, Two Shadow, Two Mystic, Two Blademaster, Two Ranger

Light is a lot like Noble in Set 1. The buff is strong early, but you get weak in the mid game as you try to put in all six Light. It functions best with a 3-star Vayne and Nasus, but an early 2-star Kindred can take it a long way. Look to get Vayne, Nasus, and Jax online, then add in Kindred to get Ranger buff.

If your Kindred is 2-star, you’ll want to keep her in and get to 7 as quickly as possible to add the other Lights. Otherwise, you can put in the Lights at 6 and add in the Shadows later. Keep in mind that you will lack damage without Kindred and another Shadow if Vayne is not 3-starred. Sion is a good stand-in Shadow until you hit Master Yi. If you can get a Spatula and make a Light, put it on Kindred and take out Soraka.

Yorick, Nasus, Jax, and Aatrox should be in the front line, while Vayne, Soraka, and Kindred are the back line. Master Yi will float somewhere in the middle, depending on the board tiles.

Give Vayne attack speed carry items like Runaan’s Hurricane, Guinsoo’s Rageblade, and Phantom Dancer. Kindred can use mana items like Seraph’s Embrace or Spirit of Sojin in addition to traditional attack speed items. Give leftover tank items to Jax and leftover carry items to Master Yi or Aatrox.

Shadow Summoner

Annie is a key member of the frontline of the Shadow Summoner comp (Image via Riot Games)

Annie is a key member of the frontline of the Shadow Summoner comp (Image via Riot Games)

Core (7): Malzahar, Varus, Kindred, Sion, Annie, Yorick, Master Yi

Synergies (4): Four Shadow, Three Summoner, Three Inferno, Two Ranger

Shadow is like a better version of Imperials from Set 1. Even if you can’t get to four right away, the Shadow buff is active on all units. The units themselves are also good standalone units and allow for very flexible builds. In this version, Kindred is activating Shadow, Inferno, and Ranger all at the same time.

Pick up any 2-star units you can early, as this is a heavier lineup with more expensive units. Use any Ranger to pair with Kindred early, and Zyra is a great placeholder that gives Summoner and Inferno traits. Veigar can be used to put in Shadow 2 or 4 as needed. Don’t feel rushed to put in 1-star Shadow units over whatever 2-star units you hit early.

Sion, Annie, and Yorick should be on your front line.  You want Sion to be in the center to tank most of the damage, while Yorick and Annie build their mana on the sides to get their important ultimates off. Master Yi will sit in the second row, while the rest of the composition will be spread out in the back line. Kindred can move up to the third row, especially if they have extra mana to ultimate quickly.

Carry items go on Kindred and Master Yi. Kindred again wants mana and attack speed items, while Master Yi wants attack speed and tanky stats. Sion can carry leftover tank items, while Malzahar can carry leftover mana items. Annie and Yorick do well with a Guardian Angel to make sure they get their ultimates off.

Blademaster Assassin

(Image via Riot Games)

(Image via Riot Games)

Core (8): Rek’Sai, Yasuo, Nocturne, Sivir, Qiyana, Janna, Kha’Zix, Master Yi

Synergies (6): Two Desert, Three Assassin, Two Mystic, Two Steel, Two Cloud, Four Blademaster (with item)

This is the only composition that requires a Spatula item, but Blademaster Assassin is too good to ignore. Therefore, it’s preferable to have an early Spatula before committing to this build. It can still be run without hitting 4 Blademasters, but part of the power is in making an Assassin the 4th Blademaster.

Early placeholder units include Diana and Leblanc for Assassins. Azir can be used with Sivir to give Desert until Kha’Zix is found. Rek’Sai is good for giving Steel buff to Nocturne, but that becomes less necessary if Nocturne isn’t holding your items as a carry. Janna can also be subbed out for another unit if it’s a Cloud map, meaning Qiyana gives that buff. Given the number of magic damage compositions, though, you will likely want to find a replacement Mystic.

Outside of using tiles, Assassin compositions want to be along the back line. That’s so enemy teams move forward, allowing the Assassins rooms to jump behind the carries. Still, make use of your elemental tiles, but try to position in a way that creates maximum distance from your opponent’s team.

Nocturne should be the primary carry, especially when running Rek’Sai. Give Nocturne Blademaster, Guinsoo’s Rageblade, and a survival item like Guardian Angel or Sword Breaker. Kha’Zix or Master Yi will be the secondary carry. Kha’Zix uses Seraph’s Embrace and Infinity Edge, while Master Yi can run any tanky items.

Tips for TFT Set 2

  • Hyper rolling is a great way to get 3-star units like Vladimir and Kog’Maw. To hyper roll, you must commit to banking gold and not leveling early. Right before you naturally level to 5 on Stage 3-1, spend all of your gold refreshing your shop to look for your 1-cost units. If you hit the 3-star, stop and play the game out normally. If not, wait until after the next PvE round and roll down again.
  • There are fewer of each unit in the pool in Set 2, so it’s even more important to scout early. You do not want to build a heavily contested composition.
  • Compositions get better or worse on different maps. Assassins hate to play on the Cloud map. The Ocean map is great for Mages and Summoners. Kog’Maw and Olaf love the Inferno map.
Michael Plant has been playing League of Legends since 2010 and analyzing it nearly as long. More recently, he's been interested in the developing PUBG and Fortnite scenes. When he's not playing or watching video games, he's more than likely following one of his Houston sports teams.