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DreamHack Valencia: Rainbow Six Siege Preview and Predictions

Craig Robinson  | 
DreamHack Valencia will run July 4-7, with $75,000 US on the line. (Image via DreamHack, Photo: Gabriel Kulig)

DreamHack Valencia will run July 4-7, with $75,000 US on the line. (Image via DreamHack, Photo: Gabriel Kulig)

DreamHack Valencia is right around the corner. With it comes an important tournament for Rainbow Six Siege. The event will feature 16 teams in the group stage with every team fighting for the $75,000 USD  prize pool. However, the biggest prize is to earn the right to attend the Six Raleigh Major in August.

The Details

DreamHack Valencia begins on July 4 with the bring-your-own-computer (BYOC) tournament. Four teams will emerge victorious from this part of the tournament, earning their passage into the group stage. A list of BYOC teams can be seen here.

On July 5, the group stages will begin with 16 teams in the competition. The teams are broken into four groups of four. Each group will play a GSL format bracket with each series a best-of-three. Each group will have two series in the first round. From there, the winners will enter the winner’s bracket whilst the losers enter the loser’s bracket. The victory of the winner’s bracket will enter the quarterfinals, whilst the loser will face the victor of the loser’s bracket match. This will decide the final quarterfinal seeding from each group.

On Saturday, July 6, the playoffs begin with first seeds taking on another group’s number second seed (letter = group and number = seed). A1 will face D2, B1 challenge C2, C1 take on B2 and D1 battles A2. Winners will then advance into the semi-final with groups moving to the third and fourth match of the grand final of the LAN.

The winner of the event will take home $30,000 and a ticket to the Six Raleigh Major. If the DreamHack Valencia champion has already earned their right to compete at the Six Raleigh Major, then the other finalist will automatically earn that reward.  If both grand finalists are already attending the Major, then the third-fourth decider will compete for the Six Raleigh Major slot. This is possible as FaZe Clan and LFO are already qualified for the Major due to their appearance at the Season 9 Milan Finals.

Who is Attending?

As it stands, there are twelve confirmed attendants participating in the group stages of the tournament on July 5th – 6th. Of these teams, five are European, two are APAC representatives, two are LATAM teams, with the remaining three hailing from North America.

European Teams:
Looking For Org (ex LeStream Esports)
Team Vitality
Chaos Esports Club
Natus Vincere
PENTA Sports

North American Teams:
TSM
Team Reciprocity
Rogue

APAC Teams:
Cloud 9
Farther’s back

LATAM Teams:
FaZe Clan
Team oNe eSports

Predictions for DreamHack Valencia

With Season 10 well underway, LFO look like they have a solid grasp over Europe. With teams predominantly European at this event, LFO should have an easier time heading to the finals. However, this squad is renowned for faltering at LAN. At the Season 9 Milan finals, they lost to FaZe Clan in the quarterfinals. However, at the Allied Vegas Minor, they exited the Swiss System 3-2 and finished second overall.

This may be a sign that this team needs a warm up before they go far on LAN. Alternatively, their international appearances have been improving ever so slowly over in 2019, and DreamHack Valencia may be the tournament they eliminate their personal LAN taboo. Given the team’s current trajectory, this should a be a solid victory to officially kick off their era in Rainbow 6 Siege professional scene.

With that said, the Six Raleigh Major invite is open for grabs. Presuming LFO gains the B1 seeding in the playoffs, then this may be in favor of Team Reciprocity, Na’Vi or Team Vitality, given the seedings. There are many more options in this list, but this is based on who is presumably in the last two quarterfinal brackets. Only time will tell but this is a very exciting playoff bracket, nonetheless.

Craig Robinson
Craig Robinson
Craig is passionate about two things: History and Gaming. Whilst at university, Craig focused his degree on history and voluntarily wrote about esports on the side. Nowadays, he tends to write about esports whilst enjoying history as a hobby.