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Complete Overwatch World Cup Rosters

Justin Hartling | 
Will anyone be able to top the stacked Korean roster in the Overwatch World Cup?

Will anyone be able to top the stacked Korean roster in the Overwatch World Cup?

The Overwatch World Cup is quickly approaching and the competing nations are slowly announcing the rosters that will represent them on the international stage. Five teams got an automatic invite to the group stage based on their national ranking (South Korea, Canada, China, France, United States). The rest of the nations will need to go through preliminary qualifying stages to earn their way into the group stage.

Keep your eyes here for all of the Overwatch World Cup rosters as they update frequently.

Direct Invites

Team South Korea

South Korea has won all three of the previous Overwatch World Cup events with ease, proving they are the dominant force in Overwatch. The nation is so deep with top-tier talent, they could likely field two teams and still dominate.

DPS

Minho “Architect” Park (San Francisco Shock)
Jae-hyeok “Carpe” Lee (Philadelphia Fusion)
Hyojong “Haksal” Kim (Vancouver Titans)

Tank

Dong-gyu “Mano” Kim (NYXL)
Hyo-bin “ChoiHyoBin” Choi (San Francisco Shock)

Support

Seung-tae “Bdosin” Choi (London Spitfire)
Ho-jin “iDK” Park (Hangzhou Spark)

Team Canada

After a down first showing in the Overwatch World Cup, Canada has become a force in the scene. The Canadians have finished second and third overall the past two years thanks to their top-flight talent. Can the canucks finally push over the hump and win the gold in 2019?

DPS

Lane “Surefour” Roberts (Los Angeles Gladiators)
Brady “Agilities” Girardi (Los Angeles Valiant)
Liam “Mangachu” Campbell (Toronto Defiant)
“Akaydia” 

Tank

Félix “xQc” Lengyel (Gladiators Legion)
Lucas “NotE” Meissner (Dallas Fuel)
Shayne “Chayne” La Rocque (Bermuda)
“Mouffin”

Support

Chris “Bani” Benell (Houston Outlaws)
William “Crimzo” Hernandez (Team Envy)
Blake “Zholik” Solberg (GRUNTo Esports)
“AutumnSouls”

Team France

France has been a solid, if underwhelming, participant in the Overwatch World Cup. Twice they have finished fifth-eighth with a solid fourth-place showing in 2017. The roster this year has some notable holes – especially at support – but are flush with talented hitscan players.

DPS

Lucas “Leaf” Loison (Team Gigantti)
Adam “Khegasi” Benaouadi (Samsung Morning Stars)
Terence “SoOn” Tarlier (Paris Eternal)
William “Asking” Vetter (Samsung Morning Stars)
Dylan “aKm” Bignet (Dallas Fuel)
Jeremy “Hqrdest” Danton (Revival)
Samir “Tsuna” Ikram (British Hurricane)

Tank

Simon “Chubz” Vullo (Samsung Morning Stars)
Gael “Poko” Gouzerch (Philadelphia Fusion)
Théo “Tek36” Guillebaud (Samsung Morning Stars)

Support

Damien “HyP” Souville (Paris Eternal)
Brice “FDGod” Monsçavoir (Young and Beautiful)

Team China

After some disappointing results in the first two years of the Overwatch World Cup, China blew up in 2018. On the back of players that many Western audiences hadn’t heard of, China made it all the way to the Finals until meeting the unstoppable Koreans in 2018.

DPS

Huang “leave” Xin (Chengdu Hunters)
Ou “Eileen” Yiliang (Guangzhou Charge)
Yi “JinMu” Hu (Chengdu Hunters)

Tank

Xu “guxue” Qiulin (Hangzhou Spark)
Luo “Elsa” Wenjie (Chengdu Hunters)

Support

Li “Yveltal” Xianyao (Chengdu Hunters)
Kong “Kyo” Chunting (Chengdu Hunters)

Team United States

Team United States has actually been underwhelming in their international appearances, finishing 5-8th in all three Overwatch World Cup events. The roster remains largely the same as 2018 with just minor additions to the lineup.

DPS

Dante “Danteh” Cruz (Houston Outlaws)
Corey “Corey” Nigra (Washington Justice)
Jay “sinatraa” Won (San Francisco Shock)
Kyle “KSF” Frandanisa (Los Angeles Valiant)
João Pedro “Hydration” Goes Telles (Los Angeles Gladiators)

Tank

Austin “Muma” Wilmot (Houston Outlaws)
Matthew “super” DeLisi (San Francisco Shock)
Russell “FCTFCTN” Campbell (Los Angeles Valiant)
Indy “SPACE” Halpern (Los Angeles Valiant)

Support

Nikola “sleepy” Andrews (Washinton Justice)
Grant “moth” Espe (San Francisco Shock)
Shane “Rawkus” Flaherty (Houston Outlaws)

Preliminary Qualifier Teams

Team United Kingdom

The United Kingdom has been gaining steam as a nation in Overwatch, getting better every year they enter the World Cup. In 2018, the 7 Lions made it to the Bronze Medal game before dropping a tight series to Canada.

DPS

Finley “Kyb” Adisi (Philadelphia Fusion)
Kai “KSP” Collins (XL2 Academy)

Tank

Cameron “Fusions” Bosworth (Boston Uprising)
Eoghan “Smex” O’Neill (Montreal Rebellion)

Support

Isaac “Boombox” Charles (Philadelphia Fusion)
Daniel “FunnyAstro” Hathaway (ATL Academy)
Harrison “Kruise” Pond (Paris Eternal)

Team Finland

Team Finland has all the talent in the world but has yet to really make it work at the Overwatch World Cup. The team is making big changes for 2019 after years of disappointing results with the likes of Jiri “LiNkzr” Masalin and Benjamin “BigGoose” Isohanni not making the roster.

DPS

Tuomo “Davin” Leppänen (Team Gigantti)
Richard “rCk” Kanerva (Boston Uprising)
Ricky “Ricky” Fox (Clockwork Vendetta)

Tank

Roni “LhCloudy” Tiihonen (Paris Eternal)
Joonas“zappis”Alakurtti (Team Gigantti)

Support

Petja “Masaa” Kantanen (Atlanta Reign)
Jonas “Shaz” Suovaara (Los Angeles Gladiators)

Team Sweden

Sweden is looking for redemption after a disappointing showing in 2018. Sweden failed to make it out of the qualifiers last year despite claiming the bronze medal the preceding two years.

DPS

Simon “snillo” Ekström (Fusion University)
“Rat” (Maryville University)
Erik “Erki” Nolander (Angry Titans)

Tank

Lukas “LullSiSH” Wiklund (Washington Justice)
Elliot “ELLIVOTE” Vaneryd (Washington Justice)

Support

Gustav “Gustav” Garpenståhl (Shu’s Money Crew)
Andreas “Epzz” Vallvingskog (Revival)

Team Germany

Germany failed to qualify for the Overwatch World Cup main stage the past two years. The team basically looks completely different than it has in the past with several intriguing German players starting to make waves in the Contenders scene.

DPS

Moritz “Engineer” Becker (Clockwork Vendetta)
“PHI”
“Rady”

Tank

Hadi Daniel “Hadi” Bleinagel (British Hurricane)
Max “Moose” Kießling (Clockwork Vendetta)

Support

Emir Kaan “illbethebest” Okumus (Shu’s Money Crew)
“Rephid”

Team Netherlands

Team Netherlands has yet to make a big impact at the Overwatch World Cup, dropping out in qualifiers in both 2017 and 2018. However, the rise of Dutch players is apparent with six of their seven roster members coming from Contenders.

DPS

Jeffrey “Vizility” de Vries (Montreal Rebellion)
Jonathan “Jona” Stelma (Young and Beautiful)
Alex “A10” Kuipers (Phase 2)

Tank

Daniël Vincentius “daans” Paulus Scheltema (Phase 2)
Thomas “brussen” Brussen (Angry Titans)

Support

Ryan “CrusaDe” van Wegen
Daan “Trispear” Robben (Square One)

Team Denmark

Denmark has yet to make it out of qualifiers during the first three years of the Overwatch World Cup. However, 2019 will see the strongest group of players assembled for the nation as all seven players are coming from the Overwatch League or Contenders.

DPS

Johannes “Shax” Nielsen (Los Angeles Valiant)
Mads “fischer” Jehg (HSL Esports)
Nikolai “Naga” Dereli (Shu’s Money Crew)

Tank

Mikkel “Molf1g” Djernes (British Hurricane)
Anders “Henningsen” Henningsen (HSL Esports)

Support

Kristian “Kellex” Keller (Boston Uprising)
Victor “Scaler” Godsk (Uprising Academy)

Team Russia

Russia found themselves in the first-ever Overwatch World Cup Finals in 2016. They have yet to find that level of success again, as the Russians failed to qualify for the group stage in both 2017 and 2018. If the team wants to make a splash in 2019, the roster will need to be hard-carried by their DPS players.

DPS

Ilya “NLaaeR” Koppalov (Atlanta Reign)
George “ShaDowBurn” Gushcha (Paris Eternal)

Tank

Denis “Tonic” Rulyov (Young and Beautiful)
Ilya “Txao” Makarov (HSL Esports)

Support

Denis “Tonic” Rulyov (Young and Beautiful)
Andrey “Engh” Sholokhov (One.PoinT)
Ruben “Rubikon” Zurabyan

Team Spain

Spain showed up in the 2016 Overwatch World cup but has failed to make it out of the qualifiers each of the past two years. The Spaniards have some well-known players, speaking neptuNo and Harryhook, but will need some lesser-known players to step-up to make it to groups.

DPS

Alberto “neptuNo” González (Philadelphia Fusion)
Alejandro “t3lle” Tellería

Tank

Esteban “Ejin” Calderon
“Solmyr”
“Jotum”

Support

Jonathan “HarryHook” Tejedor Rua (Dallas Fuel)
“Gavi”

Team Australia

As a nation, Australia largely gets overlooked on the international scene. However, we are starting to see more and more top-flight talent coming from down under, especially with the rise of Contenders Australia. The roster might not have a lot of names strictly Overwatch League fans have heard of, but there are legit OWL-level players on this team.

DPS

Felix “ckm” Murray (Retired)
Jason “ieatuup” Ho

Tank

Ashley “Trill” Powell (Dallas Fuel)
Leyton“Punk” Gilchrist (Uprising Academy)

Support

Max “Unter” Unterwurzacher (ORDER)
Giorgio “tongue” Lahdo (Warrior Esports)

Team New Zealand

New Zeland has been absent from the international scene since 2017, as the nation did not field a team last year. Thanks to the Australian Contenders scene, we are seeing more and more talent coming from New Zealand and this is a team that could quietly surprise in qualifiers.

DPS

Kelsey “Colourhex” Birse (Boston Uprising)
Christopher “August” Norgrove (Mindfreak)
Dale “Signed” Tang (ORDER)

Tank

Shilp “plihS” Naik (Mindfreak)
“Joker”

Support

Oliver “Jungle” Denby (Warriors Esports)
Paul “Truth” van Hutten (Melbourne Mavericks)

Team Brazil

Team Brazil is an intriguing team to keep an eye on in the qualifiers. The nation typically favors familiarity with the roster they assemble and 2019 is no different with five of the seven players all coming from Lowkey Esports.

DPS

Felipe “liko” Lebrao (Lowkey Esports)
Murillo “murizzz” Tuchtenhagen (Lowkey Esports)
Luiz “Ludwig” Motta (Lowkey Esports)

Tank

Maurício “honorato” Honorato (Lowkey Esports)
André “Txozin” Saidel (UP Gaming)

Support

Pedro “ole” Orlandini (Lowkey Esports)
Renan “alemao” Moretto (Boston Uprising)

Team Japan

Japan has yet to make a lasting impact on the international Overwatch scene. The team has yet to make it out of qualifiers in three attempts. There are some interesting young players, specifically HaKu who plays for XL2 Academy.

DPS

Motoshi “hoshimi” Holden (Green Leaves)
Sean Taiyo “ta1yo” Henderson (JUPITER)
Tenta “ten” Asai (Green Leaves)

Tank

Kaito “kenmohororo” Yoshida (JUPITER)
Kazuki “SamuraiD” Nouno (ioStux Academy)

Support

Robert “HaKu” Blohm (XL2 Academy)
Shunsuke “Xeraphy” Odani (Green Leaves)

Team Taiwan

Team Taiwan, officially known as Team Chinese Taipei, has shown they are just on the precipice of really becoming a strong Overwatch nation. Taiwan qualified for the Group Stage in 2016 and just missed out in both 2017 and 2018. A big plus for Taiwan in 2019 is the inclusion of Baconjack, who is the best player from that region but did not play in 2018.

DPS

Lo “Baconjack” Tzu-Heng (Chengdu Hunters)
Lin “ShaiuLin” Keng-Yu (Nova Monster Shield)
Kuo “WON” Zhan-Hao (Flag Gaming)

Tank

Wei “Craz1S” Hsiao-Chin (Bubble Burster Gaming)
Chen “ATing” Shao-Hua (Nova Monster Shield)

Support

Wang “inin77” Qi-Hong (Nova Monster Shield)
Yang “CQB” Hao-Cheng (Talon Esports)

Team Thailand

Thailand has been interesting on the international stage. In 2016, Thailand qualified for the main stage but has failed to make it past qualifiers each of the past two years. There have been quite a few holdovers on the squad over the past couple of season, so we will see if the new additions can finally get Thailand back to the Group Stage.

DPS

Ubon “oPuTo” Dara (Talon Esports on loan from MEGA Esports)
Talunt “mush2oom” Rattanaprapaporn (Xavier Esports)

Tank

Pongphop “Mickie” Rattanasangchod (Dallas Fuel)
Chaiwat “BOOMBURAPA” Wattatum (GIANT LYNX)
Teetawat “Teetawat” Teerayosyotin (Uprising Academy)

Support

Pasavit “Pannys” Svasti-Xuto (GIANT LYNX)
Kampanat “Tae” Thongjaeng (Xavier Esports)

Justin Hartling
Justin has been writing professionally for his entire career with a background in journalism and broadcasting. After writing about what other people wanted for years, Justin came up with the idea for Hotspawn – allowing him to combine his love of writing and of esports.
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